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CONSOL deploys ceramic proppant in Utica deep gas well

CARBO_Logo

CARBO Ceramics has announced the successful use of an ultra-conductive, low-density ceramic proppant technology in the Utica for CONSOL Energy. This was the first well to utilize the KRYPTOSPHERE LD proppant. It was deployed at a depth of approximately 13,500 ft . The proppant eliminated the need for gel and crosslinked fluids, leading to a reduction in overall completion cost. Initial production from the first well flowed more than 61.9 MMcfd of natural gas in a 24-hr period, making it one of the highest producing wells in the Utica to date. KRYPTOSPHERE LD is engineered to be mono-sized with exceptional strength, durability and smoothness, providing high conductivity across the entire range of low to high stress well conditions. It exceeds ...

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BP realigns senior executive team

McKay

BP has appointed Lamar McKay to the new position of Deputy Group Chief Executive. Mr McKay, currently Chief Executive of BP’s Upstream segment and a 35-year veteran of BP, will be based in London and take up the role following a suitable handover period. He will be succeeded as Upstream Chief Executive by Bernard Looney, currently Chief Operating Officer, Production, in the Upstream segment.

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Canadian project puts high-horesepower frac pump into the field

The SPM QEM 3000 was designed for continuous-duty pressure pumping operations at a sustained 275,000-lb road load, 24 hours per day, seven days per week.

Texas-based Weir Oil & Gas has partnered with Canada-based Canyon Services Group to take Weir’s SPM QEM 3000 frac pump to the field. It is the industry’s first high-horsepower frac pump designed for continuous-duty pressure pumping operations at a sustained 275,000-lb rod load, 24 hours per day, seven days per week. The pump is projected to reduce total cost of ownership by 17%.

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Next-gen microchip plots cracks, pores through frac fluids

The size of this newly developed microchip, including the on-chip camera and the pads, is only 0.55 mm by 0.85 mm.

Rice University’s Integrated Systems and Circuits (RISC) laboratory has developed a new generation of microchips, approximately the size of a grain of sand, that travels downhole through fracturing fluids to plot the cracks and pores through which oil and gas move to the surface. Activated by electromagnetic signals sent from an aboveground transceiver, the microchips return real-time data to create high-resolution maps of reservoirs and formations formed by hydraulic fracturing.

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