US EIA: Domestic production filled 84% of US energy demand in 2013

Posted on 03 June 2014

 

The US was able to produce energy to satisfy 84% of its total demand in 2013, which totaled 97.5 quads.

The US was able to produce energy to satisfy 84% of its total demand in 2013, which totaled 97.5 quads.

Total US energy production reached 81.7 quadrillion British thermal units (quads) in 2013, the US Energy Information Administration (EIA) reported this week. That is enough to satisfy 84% of total US energy demand, which totaled 97.5 quads last year. Unsurprisingly, natural gas was the largest domestically produced energy resource for the third year in a row, the agency reported.

The last significant rise in the ratio of domestic production to consumption occurred from 1978 to 1982. During that period, oil consumption declined in response to higher prices and changing policies, and production rose as oil started to flow from Alaska's North Slope. At the same time, domestic coal production was increasing.

The last significant rise in the ratio of domestic production to consumption occurred from 1978 to 1982. During that period, oil consumption declined in response to higher prices and changing policies, and production rose as oil started to flow from Alaska’s North Slope. At the same time, domestic coal production was increasing.

According to the EIA’s May Monthly Energy Review, fossil fuels, including natural gas, coal, crude oil and hydrocarbon gas liquids, accounted for more than three quarters of US energy production. In total, the United States consumed 97.5 quads of energy, 82% of which was fossil fuels. Renewable and nuclear energy made up 10% and 8%, respectively, of US energy consumption.

The portion of US energy consumption supplied by domestic production has been increasing since 2005, when it was at its historical low point of 69%. Since 2005, production of domestic resources, particularly natural gas and crude oil, has been increasing as a result of the application of new technologies. At the same time, reduced road travel, improved vehicle efficiency and competition among fuels for electric power generation have limited consumption of petroleum and coal.

 

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